Lunch Box News

How Much Can You Save by Bringing Your Own Lunch Food to Work?

When I first started working in an office full-time, How much can you save by bringing your lunch to workmy favorite part of the day was walking around Midtown Manhattan and marveling at the food choices available to me. Within a three-block radius, there were more than 20 eateries from which I could buy breakfast, lunch, or coffee – and for my first few weeks on the job, that’s precisely what I did.

I’d start each day with a pit stop at the nearby Starbucks for a morning latte. At lunchtime, I’d wander into a different deli or to-go cafe and buy whatever tempted me – sometimes soup, sometimes salad, and sometimes both.

After about a month of treating myself to store-bought coffee and prepared lunches, I got my first credit card bill since starting my job, and it was a real eye-opener. I discovered that over the course of just three to four weeks, I’d managed to spend nearly $200 on food and beverages alone.

From that moment on, I changed my ways. Instead of buying lunch every day, I packed my own soup or sandwich and brought it with me to work four days per week. I allowed myself one treat day a week, where I’d purchase something fresh or go out to lunch with coworkers to socialize and commiserate. Read more...

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Halloween Mickey Mouse Bento Lunch

Bento lunches are great. How To Make A Halloween Mickey Mouse Bento LunchThey give the opportunity for you to pack anything you want. Some people just use leftovers. Others find creative ways to make food look really fun and cute, as is the case with this Mickey Mouse Bento Lunch for Halloween. Here’s how to make it.

LUNCH DETAILS

Mickey Mouse sandwich with ham.
Trail mix candy corn
Green jello slime with mini chocolate chips
Salad with Mickey Tommy tomatoes, RIP mini Babybel, Colby Jack Cheese flower(snack cheese

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What Do Chefs Pack Their Kids For Lunch?

Hear that? It’s the sound of millions of frustrated parents staring at lunchboxes, wondering how to fill them.
What Do Chefs Pack Their Kids For Lunch?
You know who has to feed difficult, sometimes whiny people on a regular basis? Chefs. And chances are, when it comes to “having a word with the chef,” the pickiest guest of the night has nothing on that chef’s own kid. We asked chefs across the country what they feed their toughest audience, and came back with great ideas. So before you send one more soggy PB&J or give in to the appeal of Nacho Thursday, take some advice from the pros.

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One of Our My Little Pony Lunch Boxes

Here's our My Little Pony - Alicorn - Metal Lunch Box with color splash filter for Instagram. The real lunch box has full color artwork.

Alicorn My Little Pony Lunchbox

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No More White Bread Sandwiches: These Days, Our Kids' Lunches Are A Global Buffet

I vividly remember the politics of my school cafeteria. Lines were drawn as to who sat with whom and at which table, and every day, we judged what was inside each other’s lunch boxes.

No more white bread sandwiches: These days, our kids lunches are a global buffetTwo decades ago, bland was better: cold-cut sandwiches, soup from a can or a pack of Lunchables were benign and therefore acceptable. Most of the foods that I love – curries with aromatic spices, slow-cooked pork hocks, or Chinese sausage with rice – were deemed, well, gross.

But with every passing year, the country is becoming more culturally diverse, bringing the lunchbox along with it. Canada welcomed more than 250,000 immigrants in 2009, compared to just under 190,000 a decade before. In Toronto, 51 per cent of the city’s 2.7 million residents were born in another country, and newcomers settle everywhere from the prairies to the Maritimes. The 2011 census reported more than 200 different languages spoken at home. Read More...

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NYC Food Truck Lunch: Classic Corned Beef Sandwich From Deli and Dogz

NYC Food Truck Lunch: Classic Corned Beef Sandwich From Deli and Dogz
New York City is known for putting many items on the culinary map, and one of our favorites is Jewish deli food. Nothing beats a classic pastrami or corned beef sandwich on rye with mustard.

We’ve already tried the hot pastrami sandwich from Deli & Dogz (which used to be called Katz & Dogs, until Katz’s Deli objected). Next up was the corned beef sammie.

Deli & Dogz charged $12 for the sandwich, but it was piled high with meat, and came with a pickle and side of cole slaw, potato salad or macaroni salad.

We were thinking of getting 1/2 sandwich, a knish and a soda for $11.75, but were a little disappointed they only had those square potato knishes. Last time we went to Deli & Dogz, they had kasha knishes, but not anymore. You can see their ful... Read more

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The Lazy Girl's Guide To Bringing Lunch To Work Every Day

The Lazy Girls Guide To Bringing Lunch To Work Every DayI always bring my lunch from home to work and I always have. Growing up, I brought my lunch to school pretty much every day, even when I was in college. I was never a fan of school cafeteria lunch so I grew accustomed to making and packing my lunch at home and bringing it along with me. Buying lunch, especially in NYC, gets expensive and I rather save the money I would have spent on lunch and put it toward something else. However, making lunch for each day requires a tiny bit of effort, but I promise anyone can do it. Here’s a lazy girl’s guide to bringing lunch to work!

First things first, buy yourself a lunch box. This way all your food is in one bag and if something spills/leaks it won’t ruin all your stuff. Then buy the appropriate containers and Tupperware. There are containers these days to hold everything from soup to salad dressing to cereal. You definitely don’t want your handcrafted lunch getting smushed on your way to work! Read more...

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How to Play: Musical Chairs

How to Play: Musical ChairsLast one sitting wins!

What you need:
A group of children, a bunch of chairs (one fewer than the number of children playing) and music.

How to play: The chairs are arranged in a circle, facing outwards, with the players standing outside of the circle. Once the music starts, players begin walking around the circle. When the music stops, the players must sit in a chair as fast as they can. The person left standing is out of the game, one more chair is removed and the game continues.

The rules: Any pushing or shoving by players to get to a chair when the music stops will result in that player leaving the game.

How to win: Be the last person left sitting.

What else you need to know: Chairs also can be set up back to back, forming a double line, facing outwards. In another variation, you can play this game without chairs - the last person to sit down on the ground or floor is eliminated.

Annoyed Your Kids Don’t Get Along With Your Best Friend’s Offspring? Here’s How to Make It Work!

It's hard enough to find cool people to hang out with, let alone cool people who happen to have kids your kid's age and who have the same Saturday afternoon free that you do. (Adult conversation! In your very own home!)

Annoyed Your Kids Don’t Get Along With Your Best Friend’s Offspring? Here’s How to Make It Work!But instead of relaxing in the backyard over glasses of wine while the kids swarm the swing set, you keep having to get up and police.

Grrrr. Why can't they just get along?! Can't they see Mommy is socializing???

The good news is if you invest some time teaching the kids how to work things out, you may be able to get your dream afternoon back -- at some point in the future, says developmental psychologist Nancy S. Buck, Ph.D and founder of Peaceful Parenting Inc.

Her advice:

Make a playdate plan with your child in advance.
"Ask her to imagine it and tell you the story of how it will go, so she has a sense of creating the plan," Buck says. "Ask, 'how shall we handle it if there's a disagreement?' Listen to her idea, and if it's too 'magical' give her a reasonable solution." Read more...

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When to Introduce Kids to Music: Early and Often

As a musician, music educator and researcher, parents often ask me when they should begin introducing their children to music. As with most easy questions, there's an easy answer that is incomplete and a more nuanced answer that is correct.

When to Introduce Kids to Music: Early and Often
The easy answer is: You should begin age-appropriate music "lessons" soon after birth, or maybe even before birth. That being said, please stay with me before giving your 6-month-old a trumpet.

There is a great deal of research supporting the notion that musical ability develops during a critical period from birth through age 9 (or 10 or even 11, depending on the research). However, it seems clear that after age 11 the window for developing certain musical abilities is shut -- and shut forever.

This makes sense. Our brains seem to be "wired" for learning and processing the patterns we hear. This is most obvious in how young children develop language. They hear the patterns and inflections in their native tongue and their brains internalize them. Language learning seems natural, and they learn the language of the culture they're living in. A child can also learn multiple languages at this time and being bi-lingual seems natural. Yes, an adult can learn a second language, but it will rarely be as natural as the first language or without an accent.

The same is true with music. At its most basic level, music is made up from a surprisingly small vocabulary of rhythm and pitch patterns. These basic patterns vary by culture, (which is why Japanese music sounds different from Canadian music), but the basic principle of music being comprised of patterns is true of all music. Read more...

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